Advertising Propaganda are used by advertisers to improve conversions, acquire more customer and drive up sales. Here are the 15 types of advertising propaganda that you ought to know about.

Advertising propaganda are hacks used by advertisers and marketers to influence customers and clients in making decisions that help push sales. The way they do this is by shaping the opinions of individuals with the help of advertisement. Advertising Propaganda aids in effective sales and marketing of the product by attracting and enthralling the buyers, targeting selected areas of cognitive psychology.

Why do Advertisers Use Advertising Propaganda?

The purpose of all advertising is to persuade people to buy, but different types of ads use different techniques. For example, a magazine ad might show a picture of the product and tell you what it can do for you. A direct mail piece might offer you a discount on your next purchase if you act now. And an email ad might send you links to special offers or discounts.

Advertisers use different types of propaganda in their ads because they want us to change our attitudes and beliefs so that we’ll buy their products more often or at higher prices than we would otherwise.

Like it’s important to maintain the product quality, it is also important to plan your business strategies and know the correct ways to spread a word. They also want us to believe that what they’re selling is good for us or even necessary for our survival if we want to be happy and successful people in life!

Types of Advertising Propaganda

Till very recently it was thought that there are only seven types of advertising propagandas. The reason behind it was the popularity in use of the seven types of advertising propagandas.

But, the new-age digital businesses have turned the tables and discovered eight new advertising propaganda tactics that have proven their effectiveness in real world tests.

The 15 types of propagandas used in advertising which are discussed below are:

  • 1. Persuasive
  • 2. Name-calling
  • 3. Card-Stacking Propaganda
  • 4. Prejudice Appeal
  • 5. Bandwagon
  • 6. Authority Appeals
  • 7. Transfer
  • 8. Stereotyping
  • 9. Glittering Generalities
  • 10. Ad Nauseam
  • 11. Fear Appeals
  • 12. Plain Folks
  • 13. Foot In The Door
  • 14. Inevitable Victory
  • 15. Join The Crowd

#1. Persuasive Propaganda

Persuasive propaganda in advertising is a tactic used by companies to influence consumers to purchase their products or services by presenting them in a favorable light and appealing to emotions or desires. This type of propaganda often uses emotionally charged language, images, and appeals to the audience’s needs or wants in order to create a positive association with the product or service.

Examples of Persuasive Propaganda in Advertising

  1. A cleaning product company using the slogan “a clean home is a happy home” to appeal to the audience’s desire for a happy and organized home.
  2. A car company using images of families smiling and enjoying their car on a road trip to appeal to the audience’s desire for adventure and quality family time.
  3. A fitness company using testimonials from customers who have achieved their fitness goals and improved their health using the company’s products to appeal to the audience’s desire for health and wellness.
  4. A beauty product company using before and after images of customers who have used their products to improve their appearance to appeal to the audience’s desire for beauty and self-improvement.
  5. A food company using images of delicious, mouth-watering meals made with their products to appeal to the audience’s desire for delicious and satisfying food.

#2. Name-calling Propaganda

Name-calling propaganda is a type of propaganda that involves using derogatory language to attack or demean an individual or group. This tactic is often used to create negative associations with a person or group in order to make them seem less credible or likable. It is a common tactic used in political campaigns and can be seen in advertisements, speeches, and other forms of media.

Name calling propaganda is a tactic used to manipulate an audience by labeling a person or group with a derogatory or negative term in order to create a negative association in the minds of the audience. This tactic is often used to make the target appear inferior or undesirable, and to create division and hatred among the audience.

How Name-Calling Propaganda can be used for Your Advertising Campaign

  1. A cigarette company using the slogan “real men smoke X brand” to imply that those who do not smoke their brand are not masculine.
  2. A car company using the term “greenies” to refer to environmentally conscious consumers in order to make them seem weak or naïve.
  3. A beauty product company using the term “wrinkly” to describe those who do not use their anti-aging cream, in order to create a sense of shame and desire to purchase their product.
  4. A fast food chain using the term “health nuts” to refer to those who choose healthy options, in order to make them appear uptight or extreme.
  5. A clothing brand using the term “basic” to describe those who do not wear their brand, in order to make them appear unoriginal and uninteresting.

#3. Card-Stacking Propaganda

There are a lot of ways to manipulate your audience. One of the easiest is to use card stacking, or the practice of making one point that’s supposed to be good for you and would sound like it’s also good for everyone else. Card stacking is a common advertising technique, used in commercials and print ads all the time. It can be very subtle or very blatant, but it’s always there.

So instead of saying “Our product is better than our competitor’s,” they say “Our product is better than our competitor’s and it costs less.”

Here, the second statement isn’t true — at least not always. But if you’re trying to advertise something that isn’t generally accepted as being better than its competitor, it can make all the difference in how successful your marketing campaigns and/or your advertisement will be.

An Insight on How You Can use this form of Advertising Propaganda for Your Business

  1. A car company only featuring customer reviews that rave about the car’s performance and safety features, while withholding any negative feedback or complaints.
  2. A beauty product company only showing before and after images of customers who have had significant results from using their product, while ignoring any customers who did not see the same results.
  3. A weight loss supplement company only featuring testimonials from customers who have lost significant amounts of weight using their product, while ignoring any customers who did not see the same results or experienced negative side effects.
  4. A food company comparing their product to a lower-quality alternative in order to make their product appear superior, while ignoring any potential drawbacks or drawbacks of their own product.
  5. A cleaning product company only highlighting the benefits of their product, such as its effectiveness and natural ingredients, while downplaying any potential drawbacks or negative impacts on the environment.

#4. Prejudice Appeal Propaganda

Prejudice is a strong feeling of dislike, or a preconceived judgment, usually against someone or something regarded as different. The term prejudice is often used to describe an attitude based on implicit or explicit stereotypes. In this sense, it is more commonly applied to the personal than the social level.

Prejudice appeal propaganda in advertising is a tactic used to manipulate an audience by appealing to their existing biases and prejudices in order to persuade them to buy a product or service. This tactic often involves using stereotypes, generalizations, or scapegoating to create an association between the product or service and a particular group of people, and to make the audience feel superior to or better than that group.

Examples of how Businesses use this Tactic

  1. A car company using images of rugged, masculine men to sell their trucks, implying that only real men drive trucks.
  2. A beauty product company using images of thin, white women to sell their products, implying that only thin, white women are beautiful.
  3. A fast food chain using patriotic imagery and language to sell their burgers, implying that only true Americans eat their burgers.
  4. A cleaning product company using fear of germs and illness to sell their disinfectant spray, implying that only their product can protect you and your family from germs.
  5. A clothing company using images of wealthy, successful people to sell their products, implying that only wealthy, successful people can afford and wear their clothes.

#5. Bandwagon Propaganda

The bandwagon propaganda technique uses the bandwagon effect to create a positive attitude toward a certain idea, group, or cause. The bandwagon effect is the tendency for people to do things because many other people are doing it. Bandwagon propaganda takes advantage of this by portraying an idea as popular or fashionable.

The bandwagon propaganda technique can be used by companies selling products and services but also by political parties who want people to vote for them or join their cause. It’s often used when someone feels uncertain about what to do or how best to proceed.

Bandwagon Propaganda in Action

  1. A car company using the slogan “join the millions of satisfied customers” to create a sense of exclusivity and popularity for their product.
  2. A beauty product company using images of celebrities and influencers using their products to create a sense of trendiness and popularity.
  3. A fast food chain using the phrase “be part of the movement” to create a sense of belonging and exclusivity for those who eat at their restaurants.
  4. A cleaning product company using the phrase “limited time offer” to create a sense of urgency and scarcity for their product.
  5. A clothing brand using images of large crowds wearing their clothes at events or festivals to create a sense of popularity and trendiness.

#6. Authority Appeals Propaganda

Authority appeals are a sub-category of social proof. They are persuasive messages that appeal to the authority of an expert or an authority figure. Authority appeals are commonly used in advertising, where they are sometimes referred to as “testimonials.” They involve using someone or something with perceived authority to make an argument seem more valid or believable than it really is.

B2B businesses often use this tactic to get more leads and improve their brand awareness.

How You Can Use Authority for Your Advertising Campaigns

  1. A car company using endorsements from professional race car drivers to sell their sports cars, implying that only professional race car drivers know the value of a good car.
  2. A beauty product company using endorsements from dermatologists to sell their skincare products, implying that only dermatologists know the best way to take care of your skin.
  3. A fast food chain using endorsements from nutritionists to sell their healthy meal options, implying that only nutritionists know the best way to eat healthy.
  4. A cleaning product company using endorsements from housekeeping experts to sell their cleaning products, implying that only housekeeping experts know the best way to clean your home.
  5. A clothing brand using endorsements from fashion designers to sell their clothing, implying that only fashion designers know the best way to dress.

#7. Transfer Propaganda in Advertising

Transfer propaganda is a form of propaganda that seeks to transfer emotions from one person or group to another.

Transfer propaganda is used for two main purposes: To create a positive association between two people, groups or ideas, or to create a negative association between two people, groups or ideas.

The transfer propaganda of advertising is often used to encourage people to associate positive feelings when buying a particular product or service and associating negative feelings with buying from competitors. Advertisers may also use the transfer appeal, which is a type of appeal that involves creating an association between your product and something desirable or attractive.

The purpose of this type of advertising is to make people associate positive feelings with your product or service and then transfer those feelings onto your brand or company. The opposite effect can happen as well: If you have an unpleasant association with a product, then this will affect how you feel about it even if there’s no logical reason for it.

Examples of this Advertising Propaganda:

  1. A car company using images of the American flag and patriotic music in their advertisements to sell their cars, implying that buying their cars is a patriotic act.
  2. A beauty product company using images of happy, smiling women in their advertisements to sell their makeup, implying that using their makeup will make women happy and beautiful.
  3. A fast food chain using images of happy families enjoying their food in their advertisements to sell their meals, implying that eating their food will create happy memories with loved ones.
  4. A cleaning product company using images of sparkling clean homes and the smell of fresh flowers in their advertisements to sell their products, implying that using their products will create a fresh and inviting home.
  5. A clothing brand using images of successful, fashionable people in their advertisements to sell their clothing, implying that wearing their clothing will make people successful and fashionable.

#8. Stereotyping in Advertising Propaganda

Stereotypes are generalizations about a population based on their membership in a social group. They can be positive or negative, but they’re always broad generalizations — like all Americans are friendly or all Germans are efficient — that don’t capture the full range of human diversity.

Stereotypes play an important role in advertising as they allow advertisers to simplify complex messages into easily digestible sound bites that resonate with consumers’ expectations. They also help advertisers target specific groups within large populations.

How this Tactic looks when put in Action

  1. A car company using images of rugged, masculine men to sell their trucks, implying that only masculine men drive trucks.
  2. A beauty product company using images of thin, white women to sell their products, implying that only thin, white women are beautiful.
  3. A fast food chain using images of happy, diverse families to sell their meals, implying that their food is enjoyed by all types of families.
  4. A cleaning product company using images of perfection and order to sell their products, implying that only those who use their products have perfectly clean and organized homes.
  5. A clothing brand using images of wealthy, successful people to sell their products, implying that only wealthy, successful people can afford and wear their clothes.

#9. Glittering Generalities Propaganda

Glittering generalities are a type of propaganda that is often used in political speeches. The term was coined by Walter Lippmann, a prominent journalist and political theorist at the time. It refers to words that have a positive connotation, but lack any substance or meaning.

Advertisers use glittering generalities when their product does not stand out from competitors or when the price is too high for most consumers to afford it. Glittering generalities allow marketers to create an emotional connection with potential customers so that they will want to purchase the product even if it does not fulfill their needs completely or is not the best choice for them.

Examples of how this Advertising Propaganda is Used

  1. A car company using the slogan “the ultimate driving experience” to sell their sports cars, without providing any specific details or evidence of what makes their cars superior.
  2. A beauty product company using the phrase “the secret to beautiful skin” to sell their skincare products, without providing any specific details or evidence of how their products work.
  3. A fast food chain using the phrase “the taste of America” to sell their burgers, without providing any specific details or evidence of how their burgers are different from others.
  4. A cleaning product company using the phrase “the secret to a clean home” to sell their products, without providing any specific details or evidence of their effectiveness.
  5. A clothing brand using the phrase “the key to success” to sell their suits, without providing any specific details or evidence of how their suits are different from others.

#10. Ad Nauseam Propaganda

Ad nauseam advertising propaganda often uses interruption marketing to get its point across.

Ad Nauseam is a form of advertising that uses repetition to influence consumers into buying a particular product. It uses a variety of techniques to achieve this goal, including:

Repeating a word or phrase until it becomes part of our everyday language or the same message over and over again in different forms (television commercials, print ads, billboards) or using catchy slogans or jingles that are designed to get stuck in your head.

How Ad Nauseam Propaganda can be Implemented

  1. A car company constantly airing the same advertisement for their sports cars on every television channel, in order to saturate the market and make their product appear popular and desirable.
  2. A beauty product company constantly posting the same advertisement for their skincare products on social media, in order to saturate the market and make their product appear popular and desirable.
  3. A fast food chain constantly running the same advertisement for their burgers on billboards and buses, in order to saturate the market and make their product appear popular and desirable.
  4. A cleaning product company constantly sending out the same advertisement for their products in the mail, in order to saturate the market and make their product appear popular and desirable.
  5. A clothing brand constantly running the same advertisement for their clothing on fashion blogs and websites, in order to saturate the market and make their product appear popular and desirable.

#11. Advertising Propaganda using Fear to Appeal to Consumers

Fear-based propaganda is a form of advertising that uses fear as its primary persuasive technique. Fear is an effective tool because it’s an instinctual response to danger. The brain automatically responds to fear with an increased heart rate, faster breathing, sweating and increased blood flow to the muscles. These changes prepare us to fight or flee from danger.

Fear appeals are not new, but they’ve grown increasingly more common as technology has made it easier for advertisers to create more vivid images for their ads. While this can be effective when done well, it can also backfire if used inappropriately.

Examples of this Form of Advertising

  1. A car company using images of car accidents and statistics about the importance of car safety in their advertisements to sell their cars, implying that only their cars are safe and that not buying their cars puts you at risk of an accident.
  2. A beauty product company using images of aging and wrinkles in their advertisements to sell their anti-aging cream, implying that only their cream can prevent wrinkles and that not using their cream will make you look old.
  3. A fast food chain using images of unhealthy, overweight people in their advertisements to sell their healthy meal options, implying that only their healthy options can prevent obesity and that not eating their healthy options will make you unhealthy and overweight.
  4. A cleaning product company using images of dirty homes and the spread of germs in their advertisements to sell their disinfectant spray, implying that only their spray can prevent the spread of germs and that not using their spray will make your home dirty and unhealthy.
  5. A clothing brand using images of people being judged and ridiculed for their fashion choices in their advertisements to sell their clothing, implying that only their clothing is fashionable and that not wearing their clothing will make you the subject of ridicule.

#12. Plain Folks Propaganda

The Plain Folks Propaganda in advertising can be seen in many different ways, including through the use of actors, celebrities, models and other people who are not real consumers of the product being advertised. This helps to make the ad seem more believable and trustworthy because it makes it seem like these people are real consumers who have used this product before and like it very much!

This tactic taps into the people factor of the marketing 3Ps to increase its effectiveness.

Plain Folks Propaganda in Action

  1. A car company using images of regular people driving their cars in everyday situations in their advertisements to sell their cars, implying that their cars are suitable for everyday use and that regular people can afford and enjoy them.
  2. A beauty product company using images of regular people using their products in their advertisements to sell their skincare products, implying that their products are suitable for everyday use and that regular people can afford and enjoy them.
  3. A fast food chain using images of regular people enjoying their food in their advertisements to sell their meals, implying that their food is suitable for everyday use and that regular people can afford and enjoy it.
  4. A cleaning product company using images of regular people using their products to clean their homes in their advertisements to sell their products, implying that their products are suitable for everyday use and that regular people can afford and enjoy them.
  5. A clothing brand using images of regular people wearing their clothing in everyday situations in their advertisements to sell their clothing, implying that their clothing is suitable for everyday use and that regular people can afford and enjoy it.

#13. Foot In The Door (FITD) Propaganda

FITD is a kind of propaganda that is used in advertising. It is also known as foot-in-the-door technique or door-in-the-face technique.

The main idea behind FITD is to get people to agree initially with a small request and then later use this agreement as leverage to make them agree with a larger request. In advertising, FITD is used by advertisers to accomplish several goals such as getting people to buy their products and services, spread awareness about some issue, etc.

Examples:

  1. A car company offering a free test drive of their sports car to potential customers, using the initial positive experience of driving the car to persuade them to buy it.
  2. A beauty product company offering a free sample of their skincare products to potential customers, using the initial positive experience of using the products to persuade them to buy the full-sized products.
  3. A fast food chain offering a discount on their healthy meal options to potential customers, using the initial positive experience of eating their healthy meals to persuade them to continue buying them.
  4. A cleaning product company offering a free trial of their disinfectant spray to potential customers, using the initial positive experience of using the spray to persuade them to buy the full-sized product.
  5. A clothing brand offering a discount on their clothing to potential customers, using the initial positive experience of wearing their clothing to persuade them to continue buying from them.

#14. Inevitable Victory Propaganda

Inevitable victory propaganda in advertising is a tactic used to manipulate an audience by creating the impression that the product or service being advertised is already successful and widely accepted, and that it is only a matter of time before everyone uses it.

This tactic often involves using language and imagery that implies that the product or service is already popular, successful, or superior, and that it is only a matter of time before everyone realizes this and starts using it. Although this is a tactic to lure in clients and customers, you should not personally believe in the talk behind this advertising strategy, or else it may lead to marketing myopia.

How this Advertising Propaganda Strategy is Applied

  1. A car company using the slogan “the future of driving” to sell their electric cars, implying that their cars are the future and that only their cars are advanced and modern.
  2. A beauty product company using the phrase “the next big thing in skincare” to sell their products, implying that their products are the next big thing and that only their products are innovative and effective.
  3. A fast food chain using the phrase “the future of fast food” to sell their healthy meal options, implying that their healthy options are the future and that only their options are healthy and sustainable.
  4. A cleaning product company using the phrase “the next big thing in cleaning” to sell their products, implying that their products are the next big thing and that only their products are effective and efficient.
  5. A clothing brand using the phrase “the future of fashion” to sell their clothing, implying that their clothing is the future and that only their clothing is fashionable and trendy.

#15. Join The Crowd Advertising Propaganda

Join the crowd propaganda in advertising is a tactic used to manipulate an audience by creating the impression that the product or service being advertised is already popular and widely accepted, and that by using it the audience will be joining the “in” crowd and be part of a movement or trend.

This tactic often involves using language and imagery that implies that the product or service is already popular and successful, and that by using it the audience will be part of a larger group of satisfied customers or trendsetters.

The key to this strategy is to create an image that represents a group of people who support your product or brand. This could be as simple as adding a hashtag to your adverts, or creating a strong visual representation of the crowd that supports your product. Influencer marketing, conducting giveaways on Instagram works best to support this form of advertising propaganda.

Putting this Advertising Tactic in Action

  1. A car company using the slogan “everyone is driving our cars” to sell their cars, implying that their cars are already popular and that by buying one the audience will be part of a larger group of satisfied customers.
  2. A beauty product company using the phrase “join the skincare movement” to sell their products, implying that their products are already popular and that by using them the audience will be part of a larger group of trendsetters.
  3. A fast food chain using the phrase “everyone is eating our food” to sell their meals, implying that their food is already popular and that by eating it the audience will be part of a larger group of satisfied customers.
  4. A cleaning product company using the phrase “everyone is using our products” to sell their products, implying that their products are already popular and that by using them the audience will be part of a larger group of satisfied customers.
  5. A clothing brand using the phrase “everyone is wearing our clothes” to sell their clothing, implying that their clothing is already popular and that by wearing it the audience will be part of a larger group of trendsetters.

Wrapping It Up

You now know how to put these principles into practice. You understand the importance of placement, how to properly create a message, and how to create an emotional bond in your ads. Being successful with ad campaigns is just a matter of doing the proper research and using this knowledge in combination with your own ideas.

But even with all that in place, you need to have a solid product, with a solid business foundation behind it that has a tried and tested business plan, a solid business model and a revenue model that works. Check our companion resources for more information on it.

Need help with your business growth? Send us an email at adhip[at]winsavvy.com or book a meeting for free here!

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Author Bio: Isha Mudgal is part of WinSavvy’s editorial team. She hails from a tech background and writes predominantly on marketing and tech. Follow her on LinkedIn

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